Reading Notes

February has been one crazy month; so far I’ve had an eye infection, a car accident, and a stomach bug, not to mention a pile of midterms to grade. This would have been a four-day weekend, but both days were taken away to make up for all the earlier snow days. Yes, I know we had the time off earlier instead, but there’s not another break for teachers until Easter.

Despite what the lack of posts suggests I have been reading, just not finishing books. Halfway through February I am still making progress on my reading plans. I’m more than two thirds through The French Lieutenant’s Woman, which both is and isn’t what I expected. I’m reserving judgment until I see how it all turns out. Ivanhoe is much slower going, and also read less because it’s my purse book. I just reached the 100 page mark this afternoon, though, and the action is starting to pick up. Right now a mysterious knight is having surprising success at the tournament, making many fans and also an enemy. Sir Walter Scott seems to have borrowed heavily from existing material in spinning his tale, whether or not his sources were accurate.

It may seem sort of silly, but with longer books like these I find myself constantly checking how far I am, and how far I still have to go. Right now I only have about twenty minutes a day to read; sometimes it feels like I’m not making any progress, and there are so many other books I want to read as well! I don’t usually read two dense books together, so that might be part of the problem. Once I get lost in the story, though, I stop looking at page numbers and they seem to pass quickly.

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Published in: on February 20, 2011 at 9:12 pm  Comments (2)  

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2 CommentsLeave a comment

  1. It took me a couple of tries before I managed to finish Ivanhoe, but I ended up really liking it.

    • It seems pretty good so far, just a little slow; I don’t do very well with books when I only read them a little bit at a time. This is one of the few classics where I remember nothing about the Wishbone version.


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